Ethiopian Business Review

An “instant” or “serviced” office is one that is fully equipped and managed by a company that then rents it out to individuals and businesses. Although instant offices are often found in cities worldwide, it is a new phenomenon in Ethiopia. Driven by the increasing number of foreign investors, business travelers, startup businesses, and non-profit organizations, the business model is now gaining momentum. EBR’s Mikiyas Tesfaye explores the issue.

Thursday, 15 February 2018 06:00
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Access to financial services contributes immensely to economic growth. This is why nations come up with the right mix of policies to expand financial services. Ethiopia, too, has been reforming its financial sector for the last two decades. However, the sector remains immature, even in comparison to other Sub-Saharan African countries.

To ameliorate the situation, the government has been intensifying its efforts to expand financial services. In 2014, the National Bank of Ethiopia (NBE) made it a requirement for financial institutions to increase their branches by 25Pct annually. This resulted in an unprecedented expansion of financial services. A year before that, the bank introduced a mobile and agent banking policy. As a result, close to 2 million clients are now using mobile banking, while 16,000 agents operate in the country.

Furthermore, last April the NBE introduced the country’s financial inclusion strategy, which analyses the state of financial exclusion in the country and highlights the need to create a cogent framework to tackle the problem. EBR explores.

Thursday, 15 February 2018 03:00
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As population keeps increasing and fighting poverty becomes a top global agenda, the need to increase agricultural production has become a priority especially in developing countries like Ethiopia. For that, experts advise policy interventions that can help to increase productivity and production. Using improved technologies and increasing farm size have for long been advised to increase output. Ethiopia has been going in the same direction.

Yet, there is one thing that it was not well thought of to improve food security – managing post harvest loss. The intervention -- which can be achieved without major cost -- can help avoid much of the loss of output which reaches up to 50Pct in some products.  Post harvest loss for major cereal crops, except Teff, is around 24Pct in Ethiopia; the loss for oilseeds is between 15Pct and 25Pct while vegetables and fruits incur the highest loss of about 50Pct. This occurs almost at every stage of the supply chain. EBR explores the issue.

Friday, 01 December 2017 06:00
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